Recent Stories

Richard T. Greener

Larger than life

February 21, 2018, Chris Horn

Richard T. Greener’s larger-than-life story is one of academic achievement, professional success and civic service, played out mostly in the tumultuous years after the Civil War. It’s a story of firsts — in addition to being USC’s first black professor, Greener was also Harvard’s first black graduate and America’s first black diplomat to a country of white citizenry.

Caitlyn Jennings in Bolivia

Passport to success

February 19, 2018, Mary-Kathryn Craft

Global studies, one of the University of South Carolina’s newest and fastest growing majors, equips students to lead in our increasingly connected world. An interdisciplinary program housed in the College of Arts and Science, global studies is home to 125 undergraduates who focus on humanities paired with intensive language study and courses in professional schools.

joseph parks

Medical researchers work together to improve South Carolina's health

February 08, 2018, John Brunelli

National Council for Behavior Health medical director Joseph Parks will be the keynote speaker at the Integrated Behavioral Health Symposium spearheaded by the College of Social Work. The symposium will be held Monday (Feb. 12) at the Alumni Center.

mass

Peace be with you

January 31, 2018

One of the splendors of music is its power to inspire joy, acceptance and understanding among people of all backgrounds and beliefs. It is widely recognized that Leonard Bernstein’s dramatic "MASS: Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers" does just that, bringing to life diverse views on spirituality, self-reflection and personal responsibility through the musical means only one of America’s greatest composers could envision.

Freeze-dried crickets

Guess what's coming to dinner

January 25, 2018, Chris Horn

Insects are regularly consumed by an estimated 2 billion people, a practice that has its roots in culture and sometimes necessity. Law professor Marie Boyd studies the regulation of insects as food as part of her research on the Food and Drug Administration. She says insect-based food has a long way to go, both from a cultural and regulatory standpoint, in the U.S.

carolina day

Carolina Day: A stronger UofSC, A stronger South Carolina

January 25, 2018, Jeff Stensland

Carolina Day at the Statehouse is an annual one-day event designed to let legislators know that state support is vital for the University of South Carolina to ensure quality, access and affordability. This year, USC is taking a new approach that will allow more supporters than ever to participate — whether they're in Columbia or anywhere around the globe.

Russ Meekins

Remembering Russ Meekins

January 18, 2018, Chris Horn

The university community is invited to a celebration of life at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 23 in the My Carolina Alumni Center in memory of Russ Meekins, executive director of University Foundations who died unexpectedly Dec. 23.

Tori Vaeth at hotel

The 'SEARCH' for purpose

January 12, 2018, Kathryn McPhail

A cherished, childhood friendship led Tori Vaeth to study special education at the University of South Carolina. Now, the College of Education double alumna is leading a program that’s training and placing young adults with intellectual disabilities in rewarding careers.

ultrasound education

The curious case of Marcus Brown

January 09, 2018, Chris Horn

Marcus Brown is a fictional high school student athlete whose medical history is the centerpiece of a teaching module in anatomy and biology courses at 20 middle and high schools that participated in a joint venture with USC’s School of Medicine and the College of Education. The project gives students an interesting case study that guides them through an exploration of various physiological conditions that might have contributed to the star athlete’s untimely death.

Ben Maronites

Nothing but blue skies

January 02, 2018, Chris Horn

The forecast for Benjamin Marosites’ professional goals while attending Carolina went from “foggy” to “sunny and clear” in just one semester. The undeclared major enrolled in the geography department’s weather and climate course, which ignited his curiosity about meteorology, prompted him to change majors and helped launch his career as an emergency planner for Richland County.

Exercise science in action

No. 1! UofSC sport science programs top national rankings

December 20, 2017, Allen Wallace

The University of South Carolina’s sport science programs are ranked No. 1 in the United States for the second year in a row, and No. 4 in the world by ShanghaiRanking's 2017 Global Ranking of Sport Science Schools and Departments.

Capstone adulting series

Adulting 101

December 13, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

This semester, Capstone Scholars were offered an array of workshops that taught them valuable skills that are not offered in the typical classroom environment.

Billy Buckner

Comeback win

December 12, 2017, Chris Horn

It’s been 13 years since Billy Buckner played baseball for the University of South Carolina, memorably striking out 16 batters one afternoon against Clemson and winning seven games in the 2004 season. Now, after taking several online classes and on campus, he has a bachelor’s in interdisciplinary studies from the College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management.

karate kids

The karate kids

December 04, 2017, Chris Horn

The martial arts craze of the 1970s had hundreds of students signing up for Carolina's karate course. Many of those students including Keith Vitali and his younger brother, Steve, competed successfully in tournaments around the country, making Columbia and the University of South Carolina an important center of karate competition.

capstone scholars

Gateway to adventure

November 30, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

Whether heights, spiders or dark corners, we all have fears that need facing. Students in the Capstone Scholars program are encouraged to address their fears head-on and realize their potential through the Personal Challenge — a pillar of the Capstone experience that requires students to step out of their comfort zones and try something new.

Tatiana Kostova

Moore School trailblazer honored with Carolina Distinguished Professorship

November 30, 2017, Amanda Hernandez

For 21 years, Tatiana Kostova, Buck Mickel Chair and Professor of International Business at the University of South Carolina's Darla Moore School of Business, has been an integral part of the Moore School faculty. Her hard work and success with students have culminated this year with a Carolina Distinguished Professorship award.

The future of retailing

It's about to get personal

November 27, 2017, Allen Wallace

Imagine going shopping and having your phone or fitness tracker make product recommendations for you based on your breath or the current physical state of your body. It is not science fiction. It’s the future of retailing and health care digitization according to researchers at University of South Carolina’s College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management.

Kathleen Parker

Washington Post columnist gives personal archive to UofSC

November 20, 2017, Peggy Binette

Students and scholars will have a richer understanding of contemporary politics and culture thanks to Washington Post columnist Kathleen Parker. The 2010 Pulitzer Prize winner who lives in Camden, South Carolina, and writes the nation’s most widely syndicated column, has given her personal archive to the University of South Carolina Libraries’ South Carolina Political Collections.

President Pastides

Think Twice UofSC

November 17, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

On a campus with almost 1,800 international students from 95 different counties, the University of South Carolina has supreme rankings when it comes to accommodating those from various backgrounds. While the environment is welcoming to all, a few students are taking the initiative to stop subtle acts of discrimination that often go unnoticed.

Dr. Grady

Doing big things together

November 13, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

It’s not every day that a simple interaction with a professor leads you to the Olympics, or even to finding a trusted mentor, but it is for students who are lucky enough to interact with John Grady. After 13 years at the University of South Carolina, these inspiring interactions have resulted in Grady being honored with the 2017 Outstanding Advocate for First-Year Students Award.

Students ride the shuttle.

Crosstown Traffic

November 09, 2017, Craig Brandhorst

Life on an urban campus comes with lots of traffic. But it’s not just car traffic, especially these days, and it’s not all bad. With the surge in private and public-private student housing downtown, and improvements to bike lanes and shuttle service, the campus commute doesn’t have to be a headache. In fact, for many students, ditching the drive provides a welcome improvement to quality of life.

Dance preview

Creating the dancer

November 09, 2017, Page Ivey

Stacey Calvert has been a devotee of choreographer George Balanchine since she was a young dancer. “The choreography is brilliant; it’s beyond brilliant,” she says. "It’s super organic to dance. As a dancer, it makes perfect sense.” That is why Calvert has staged a Balanchine program every spring for the past 14 years as a dance professor at the University of South Carolina.

Dr. Lawrence Hill

Creating opportunities

November 08, 2017, Megan Sexton

Lawrence Hill arrived in Columbia in the summer of 1977 as a student in the first-ever class at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. Now, the Greenville urologist is making a gift to ensure other students will have the same opportunities to receive a top-rate medical education. His planned gifts of $3 million to the School of Medicine Columbia and $3 million to the School of Medicine Greenville will be used for scholarships.

Karlye Denner

Undergraduate research opens door to opportunity

November 03, 2017, Jalesa Cooley

Pre-med sophomore Karlye Denner was working at a Columbia health clinic when she began to notice the high number of Latino patients who seemed at risk for diabetes. Intrigued, the Capstone Scholar from Closter, New Jersey, applied for a Magellan Apprentice Undergraduate Research Grant to conduct independent research on the issue.

Breathe Easier

Breathe easier

October 31, 2017, Chris Horn

Just because lung cancer patients are living longer and sometimes even cured of the disease, long-term survivors of the disease often cope with distressing symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, depression and anxiety. Karen Kane McDonnell, a nursing professor in USC’s College of Nursing, plans to test an intervention to reduce their symptom burden.

First Lady Patricia Moore-Pastides holding her new book

Home on the Horseshoe

October 30, 2017, Megan Sexton

A new book by first lady Patricia Moore-Pastides shares what life is like inside one of the most recognizable buildings on campus. “At Home in the Heart of the Horseshoe: Life in the University of South Carolina President’s House,” offers a look at the first families and their memories of the home, along with some history of the house and photographs of the home and gardens. There are even a few recipes for entertaining and photos of floral arrangement designs.

Kandy Velázquez

Easing the pain

October 27, 2017, Alyssa Yancey

Inspired by the loss of her aunt to breast cancer, Kandy Velázquez decided to pursue research on how to ease pain. Velázquez, an alumna of the Arnold School of Public Health and a current post doctoral fellow in the School of Medicine, will receive nearly $1 million from the National Institutes of Health over the next five years to fund her research.

Xiaoming Li

Fighting disease with data

October 25, 2017, Chris Horn

Without consistent medical supervision, HIV patients remain infectious and often have dire health outcomes. But two Arnold School of Public Health professors and an interdisciplinary team from the University of South Carolina have a plan to help reduce HIV infections in South Carolina and make medical care more responsive for those diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

Kristn Heyer

Immigration ethics

October 25, 2017, Mary-Kathryn Craft

Boston College theological ethics professor Kristin Heyer will deliver the 18th annual Cardinal Joseph Bernardin Lecture in Moral, Ethical and Religious Studies. Heyer says today’s immigration dialogue often has been framed in terms of crisis management alone, and she will explore how the scripture and Catholic social tradition can shape the debate.

Dr. Ross

A thousand passions, 1 heartbeat

October 20, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

University of South Carolina College of Education alumnus and Chapin High School principal, Akil Ross, was named the 2018 National Principal of the Year on Friday, October 20. The honor is the culmination of a passionate career as an educator that began just a few miles away from our campus 16 years ago.